New BMJ study is the latest to show link between Actos and bladder cancer

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by Jim Orr

A new study published by Canadian researchers in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has found that patients who use the diabetes drug Actos are 63% more likely to develop bladder cancer. Researchers also found that this Actos bladder cancer risk increases the longer that patients are treated with the drug.

The study is the latest in a growing body of research confirming the link between Actos and bladder cancer. In 2005, the first study was published linking Actos to an increased risk of bladder cancer. Since then, other studies have also found that Actos users may be more likely to develop bladder cancer.

Researchers in the BMJ study analyzed the case histories of nearly 146,000 patients who were treated with Actos between 2010 and 2013. After taking into account factors such as age, sex, and other lifestyle factors, researchers found that Actos users were 63% more likely to be diagnosed with bladder cancer. The study also found that patients who took Actos for more than two years, or who took more than 28,000 milligrams of the drug during their lifetime, were even more likely to be diagnosed with bladder cancer.

Researchers found that the increased Actos bladder cancer risk among patients was not present in those treated with a similar diabetes drug, Avandia. This suggests that the cancer risk associated with Actos is not a class-wide effect, but instead is unique to Actos.

The lead author of the BMJ study said that one reason for the different bladder cancer risks associated with Actos and Avandia is the fact that while the latter drug targets only one insulin receptor to treat diabetes symptoms, Actos targets two receptors. Researchers suggested that the additional receptor may account for the increased bladder cancer risk associated with Actos.

Sales of Actos have fallen in recent years due to the availability of safer and more effective diabetes drugs. However, patients who were treated with Actos may still be at risk of developing bladder cancer for years after they discontinued treatment with the drug.

Actos Lawsuits Filed on Behalf of Patients Diagnosed with Bladder Cancer

Patients who were diagnosed with bladder cancer after taking Actos may be eligible to file a lawsuit and receive compensation for their injuries and medical costs. Actos users who have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer or prostate cancer may also qualify to file a lawsuit.

Because the risk of bladder cancer, prostate cancer, and pancreatic cancer increases the longer a patient has been treated with Actos—and because it may take years after a patient has been treated with the diabetes drug before the first symptoms of cancer are detectable—patients who were treated with Actos years ago may only now develop signs of cancer. The first step in taking action to file a case is to speak with an experienced team of attorneys to help guide you through the process of filing a lawsuit.

Our law firm, Heygood, Orr & Pearson, is pursuing Actos lawsuits on behalf of our clients and will be involved closely with the Actos MDL and other litigation matters regarding the diabetes drug. Our attorneys have accumulated years of training and experience in handling product liability lawsuits involving dangerous drugs or defective medical devices, including cases involving the fentanyl pain patch, Yaz, and Avandia.

The lawyers at Heygood, Orr & Pearson have achieved verdicts and settlements of more than $200 million on behalf of our clients in lawsuits relating to dangerous pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and other medical products. Our attorneys will work diligently on your behalf to ensure that you receive the results that you deserve in your case.

For a free legal consultation from an attorney about filing a lawsuit and to learn more about whether you may qualify to file a case, contact the lawyers at Heygood, Orr & Pearson by calling toll-free at 1-877-446-9001. You can also contact us 24 hours a day by following the link to our free case evaluation form and answering a few simple questions about your history to get started.